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Showing posts from July, 2008

Ivory Coast makes high fashion survival

The Ivory Coast battles with soaring prices of food and fuel, but some have managed to rise above the global dilemma.

As the world's biggest cocoa producer, sacks used to store the beans have entered into the world of high fashion because of one woman's creative efforts to turn something lowly into a useful and aesthetic art form.

Liberia's women combatants Part 1

In Liberia's 14-year civil war, an estimated 30,000 women took up arms. Some were forced to do so, others had no other choice. Now that the war is over, these women are trying to re-enter society as productive citizens but promises of international assistance have not kept up with their needs.

Liberia's women combatants Part 2

In Liberia's 14-year civil war, an estimated 30,000 women took up arms. Some were forced to do so, others had no other choice. Now that the war is over, these women are trying to re-enter society as productive citizens but promises of international assistance have not kept up with their needs.

S Africa xenophobia refugees displaced again

South African authorities are moving hundreds of refugees from makeshift camps to unknown locations.

The migrants were among thousands who fled their homes in the Johannesburg area because of xenophobic violence in May and many are afraid to return to their homes in the city for fear of another wave of attacks.

Kalay Maistry reports from Johannesburg

Nigeria street kids battle to survive

Despite Nigeria's massive oil wealth thousands of homeless children live on the streets of the capital Lagos. Many take marijuana to stave off hunger and to help them fall asleep.

Haru Mutasa reports.

Drowned Egyptian Ferry- Part 1

An Egyptian criminal court has found the owner of a Red Sea ferry not guilty of manslaughter over the deaths of more than 1,000 passengers in 2006. Inside story asks: Does the dead captain of the ill fated ferry take most of the blame? Does the disaster reveal serious flaws in the emergency handling system in the country? And what is the likely impact of this ruling on the image and integrity of the Egyptian judiciary?

Kenyan Mau forest under threat

Kenya has been warned that it stands to lose more than $300mn if it doesn't save the Mau Forest.

Al Jazeera's Yvonne Ndege reports from Kenya where a newly formed special committee has been set up to move at least 3,000 families out of the area because the government failed to take any precautions.

Ferry verdict brings anger to Egyptians

Families of the victims of the Red Sea Ferry disaster that occurred two years ago went to court on Sunday.

They hoped to see someone held responsible for the deaths of more than a thousand people, but Al Jazeera's Amr el-Kahky in Hurghada reports that only one person was found guilty from the four people charged.

Dirty money Part 1

Freetown, Sierra Leone, a man disappears down an alley and returns with a carrier bag full of money. The driver sits and counts 1.2 million leones and only when satisfied hands over $400. It's illegal but it's a growing business. Everyone either is a money changer or has an uncle or friend who is. Many are ex combatants, they don't sleep, one eye always open. They have their territories and minders. Some of them handle $1000s of dollars a day for although the banks change money no-one uses them as the rate is bad and the queues last forever.

Zimbabwe farmers flee to Nigeria

The ongoing political situation in Zimbabwe has forced white farmers to leave the country and take advantage of the opportunities available in Nigeria.

The Nigerian government has asked Zimbabwe's farmers to help boost commercial farming in Nigeria.

Zimbabweans are teaching their skills to the local community, because, one farmer argued, he would rather earn foreign currency in Nigeria than starve back home.

Al Jazeera's Haru Mutasa reports.

Sudan's president pledges Darfur peace

Omar al-Bashir, Sudan's president, says he's a peacemaker, and told Darfuris this during a visit to the region.

His promises of roads and schools for the war-torn state, were welcomed with applause by the people of Darfur.

Mohammed Adow was with al-Bashir when he arrived in the northern town of El Fasher, and stayed behind to gauge reaction.

Mobile phone cash tranfers in Kenya

Concern Worldwide is pioneering an emergency project in Kenya, working through mobile phone operator, Safaricom, which runs a money transfer scheme called m-Pesa. This allows people to send cash from one part of the country to another, by paying money to an agent who then sends a text message to the recipient, who collects the cash from a second agent.

- Nigeria's Oil - Part 2

Awash in oil, yet its people, for the most part, are destitute. Nigeria discovered "liquid gold" half a century ago and today is the world's eighth largest oil exporter. But the country is plagued by corruption, inefficiency, underdevelopment and an uprising in its Niger Delta -- the area where most of its oil reserves are located. So why, some 600 billion dollars later, are Nigeria's people still among the poorest in the world? Is it the 'resource curse' or something more?

Nigeria's Oil Part 1

Awash in oil, yet its people, for the most part, are destitute. Nigeria discovered "liquid gold" half a century ago and today is the world's eighth largest oil exporter. But the country is plagued by corruption, inefficiency, underdevelopment and an uprising in its Niger Delta -- the area where most of its oil reserves are located. So why, some 600 billion dollars later, are Nigeria's people still among the poorest in the world? Is it the 'resource curse' or something more?

Zimbabwe agreement imminent

It seems that an agreement between Zimbabwe President, Robert Mugabe, and opposition leader, Morgan Tsvangirai on the coutnry's political crisis is imminent.

Al-Bashir supporters oppose ICC indictment

Supporters of the Sudanese president voice their opposition to the International Criminal Court's indictment of Omar al-Bashir, the Sudanese president.
If a warrant is issued, the president will be liable to arrest if he visits any of the 106 states that signed the treaty establishing the court.
Al Jazeera's Mohammed Adow reports that the indictment of al-Bashir could wreck democratisation plans in Sudan.

Talk to Al Jazeera - Zindzi Mandela - Part 2

Zindzi Mandela, A true child of the South African struggle, the daughter of Nelson Mandela and Winnie Madikizela. She was 18 months old when her father was imprisoned and was 15 when she first saw her father for the first time in the prison. Al Jazeera's Mike Hanna talks to Zindzi Mandela in an exclusive interview.

Talk to Al Jazeera - Zindzi Mandela - Part 1

Zindzi Mandela, A true child of the South African struggle, the daughter of Nelson Mandela and Winnie Madikizela. She was 18 months old when her father was imprisoned and was 15 when she first saw her father for the first time in the prison. Al Jazeera's Mike Hanna talks to Zindzi Mandela in an exclusive interview.

Rock Bottom -Part 2

Following in the footsteps of Child Protection worker Paul Williams, who died leaving a powerful video dairy detailing the plight of children in Sierra Leone.

Rock Bottom Part 1

Following in the footsteps of Child Protection worker Paul Williams, who died leaving a powerful video dairy detailing the plight of children in Sierra Leone.

Sudan's 'luxury' education

For many parents in Sudan, sending their children to school is a luxury they simply cannot afford.

And for some, survival depends on sending their children to work from an early age.

However, this situation is now changing, with the government pledging to provide education for every child by the year 2015.

Al Jazeera's Imran Khan reports.

Aid agencies fear Somalia famine

Somalia has the worst humanitarian disaster in Africa.

Byt the end of this year, 3.5 million people will be tottaly dependent on n food aid.

Adding to the problems, Somalia is one of the world's most dangerous countries.

Now the Dutch Navy, which has been escorting shipments, is ending its role.

The World Food Programme says it may have to pull out.. because it can't protect its workers

Sanitation conditions at Osunyai school in Arusha

Hygiene education is part of the curriculum at Osunyai Primary school some 6 kilometres from Arusha in northern Tanzania. However, the poor sanitation conditions prevent pupils and teachers from maintaining the minimum level of hygiene.

The school has 2426 pupils (1175 boys and 1251 girls) and 44 teachers. There are only 8 latrines for 1175 boys and the same for the girls. All the teachers share 2 latrines. Needless to say, this is far less than is sufficient.

Due to over-use and poor construction, the current latrines of the Osunyai Primary School are not in a good state, some lack doors and others don't have any form of ventilation. There are no hand washing facilities and too many people are using latrine withought using water.

Hygiene education is being taught during regular lessons, the pupils are learning only in the class but they don't practice it due to lack of facilities.

Endangered minds of Niger's future generation

Education is not only a fundamental human right for all children, but the gateway out of poverty, as education is empowerment and empowerment is the key to a better life and future.

However, in Tazerzait, a remote area in Niger, the only school that was providing an education for children, was seized by the army.

Children were forced out of the school and left without a place to learn.

Education is often taken for granted in developing nations; however impoverished families in Niger are forced to accept that their children will remain out of the classroom due to the civil unrest.

The civil war has damaged children, their potential, and Niger as a whole.

Al Jazeera's May Welsh reports from northern Niger, on the endangered minds of Sahara's future children.

Rap star's message on Sudan is heard at UN

A former child soldier from Sudan's civil war has found a new forum for his message.

Emerging international hip-hop star Emmanuel Jal is trying to convince world leaders to take action now in Sudan by rapping at the UN.

This is his story, in his own words.

Waiting for peace in North Kivu

One million displaced Congolese citizens in North Kivu, in eastern Congo, are pressing for a solution to their situation as President Joseph Kabila visits former colonial ruler France.

Human cost of war in Niger

Life is a daily struggle for Tuareg villagers living in Niger, one of the world's poorest countries, they are often left with nothing in their flight from conflict.

Civil war and drought routinely disrupt the largely subsistence economy of this African nation.

Al Jazeera's May Welsh reports from northern Niger, on the violent struggle between rebels and government troops, that make it increasingly difficult for many villagers to survive.

DR Congo: Condom not yet fully accepted

The use condoms in the DR Congo capital Kinshasa is a subject that is far from getting unanimity among both the old and young generations.

"During my youth the condom was non-existent. I will never use it", says a sixty-five year old man.

Although the youth seem to be better educated, the use of the condom is not always as popular as many might think. It is still up to each and every individual to make a decision based on many factors, including past experiences

Niger's natural wealth exploited

The Tuareg people of Niger struggle to maintain their nomadic way of life in the face of uranium mining, an industry run by foreign companies that many say is having devastating environmental repurcussions.

Al Jazeera's May Welsh reports on civilians and rebels in the uranium mining zone.

Ceramics becomes key to disease control

Walter Nana Wilson, Bafoussam, Cameroon - Waterborne diseases are a big problem in the city of Bafoussam, in the West of Cameroon. Hopefully the habitants of this city will shortly forget about the diseases thanks to the introduction of locally made ceramic filters in the near future. This video shows the situation in Bafoussam at this very moment.

Desertification threatens Niger's nomads

The effects of global warming can be starkly seen in the Sahara desert, where Niger is one of the countries most vulnerable.

Al Jazeera's May Welsh reports from the country, where she found a bedouin tribe fighting possible extinction.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Education for the few

The violence in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo has caused more than 1 million people to flee their homes, including huge numbers of children. Efforts to make sure the displaced youngsters continue to receive an education face huge challenges.

Education has become one of the many casualties of the conflict in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. The mix of violence and poverty is taking a toll. Families who have fled war and lost everything must now decide between sending their children to school or out to work.

Chinese Weapons Found in Darfur

Now we have several related developments on the Darfur conflict in Sudan. Over the weekend U.N. representatives remembered seven peacekeepers who were murdered in Darfur last week. It came days after the Washington Post reported that the prosecutor for the U.N.'s International Criminal Court will seek an arrest warrant for the Sudanese President. Meanwhile, the BBC reported over the weekend that Chinese weapons were being used against civilians in Darfur. The weapons include Chinese military trucks, anti-aircraft guns, and fighter jets, and they violate a U.N. arms embargo against the Sudanese government. This is a complicated story, but we're going to go through the latest developments step-by-step. Here's more:

Prosecutor seeks to charge Sudan's president

A prosecutor at the International Criminal Court is expected to seek to charge Omar al-Bashir, Sudan's president, with genocide and crimes against humanity.

But many ask, if al-Bashir can be charged, why not also bring a case against George Bush, the US president?

Al Jazeera's Owen Fay reports.

Niger's nomad army

Niger's Tuareg population say that the benefits of uranium mining are not being distributed fairly, and a military campaign against the government is their only option.

In the first of a series of reports, Al Jazeera's May Welsh travelled to a Tuareg base in the northern Air mountains.

Migrants stay in squalor rather than return home

For many migrants trying to reach Europe, their journeys end well before they're able to leave Africa.

They get caught and deported, ending up in transit countries like Mauritania, Mali and Niger.

As Casey Kauffman reports from Mali, many prefer to live the in squalid conditions of the so-called ghettos, than return home in shame.

African migrants risk all to get to Europe

Every year, thousands of migrants from Africa risk their lives to journey through the continent and then across the Mediterranean Sea.

The journey is long and treacherous and some estimate only half of those who depart actually make it to their destination.

Many head for Lampedusa - Italy's southern most island. Nick Clark reports.

Migrants crossing the Sahara

Heads of state and government from countries surrounding the Mediterranean Sea will meet in Paris to launch the Mediterranean Union project.

On the top of the agenda is illegal immigration.

Al Jazeera's Casey Kauffman travelled to the northeast of Mali and met a group of migrants on the first leg of their journey across the Sahara.

Curse of gold

Human adornment is the driving force behind the global demand for gold. However, for the people of Western Ghana, life only gets harder as the soil under their feet gives up its cherished metal.

Libya a de facto shelter for Africans

While thousands of African risk their lives crossing to Europe every year, many from other parts of the continent stay on in North Africa because they've simply run out of money.

In Libya, undocumented migrants scratch out a living doing the jobs nobody else wants to do.

Amr El Kahky, in Tripoli, reports now on the migrants who got stuck on the road to a better life.

Media coverage of Darfur

This week's edition of The Listening Post is devoted to the media coverage of one of the most tragic and misunderstood crises in Africa: the humanitarian disaster in the Darfur region of Sudan.

Media coverage of Darfur

This week's edition of The Listening Post is devoted to the media coverage of one of the most tragic and misunderstood crises in Africa: the humanitarian disaster in the Darfur region of Sudan.

Illegal migration from Africa to EU on the rise

Leaders from Europe, Africa and the Middle East will meet in Paris this weekend to launch the Mediterranean Union.

The new body aims to strengthen ties between Europe and its southern neighbours.

Many of those migrating to North Africa and Europe come from West and Central Africa.

Their pursuit of a better life takes them on a dangerous journey north across the Sahara Desert and the Mediterranean Sea.

They leave their home countries and travel to transit countries such as Mauritania, Mali and Niger.

There, they begin their journey across desert borders to North Africa and then on to Europe.

Al Jazeera's Casey Kauffman traveled to the northeast of Mali and met up with a group of migrants on the first leg of their journey across the Sahara.

Zimbabwe pleads its case

Zimbabwe's Ambassador to the U.N., Boniface Chidyausiku addresses the Security Council ahead of a draft-resolution vote.Zimbabwe's Ambassador to the U.N., Boniface Chidyausiku addresses the Security Council ahead of a draft-resolution vote.

Lake Chad under threat

REPORT Climate change is threatening the future of Lake Chad, Africa's largest internal sea. While each year more people settle around the lake, fish stocks are rapidly dwindling. However, experts say solutions exist. (Report: A. Zajtman, M. Rabaud)

Johannesburg - South Africa

Children of the French school in Johannesburg and
representatives of Nelson Mandela's Children's Fund took part in celebrations to mark the 90th birthday of Nelson Mandela.

Threat for chimps remains

They can attract up to 30,000 dollars in the international trade for pets. So it is no surprise that Uganda's dwindling chimpanzee population remains a target for illegal traders. Despite bans on trading in primates, at least 5,000 are poached annually. But as Al Jazeera's Sophie Jackson reports, one chimpanzee sanctuary in Uganda is doing its best to rehabilitate them.

U.S.-Kenyan Farm Project Helps HIV/AIDs Sufferers

Doctors say regular, nutritious meals are vital to the success of anti-retroviral drugs that treat HIV/AIDs. But in Kenya, many people with AIDs cannot afford nutritious food, so the drug treatments are less effective. Now, Kenya's Moi University and Indiana University in the United States have launched a program to give "nutrition prescriptions" to HIV-positive patients who lack access to good food. As Cathy Majtenyi reports, the "prescriptions" are coming from farms run by the program.

Sports--Kenya holds athletics trials for the Beijing Olympic

In Kenya thousands were on hand for Olympic team trials over the weekend. In the popular 10,000-meters, it was Moses Masai, Martin Irungu Mathathi, and Micah Kogo who rose to the occasion. They look to answer the challenge of an Ethiopian team that may include Haile Gebrselassie who decided against the marathon in pollution-choked Beijing. .....

Somalia's Muslim youth movement

A ceasefire agreement is due to take effect in Somalia between the interim government and the militant groups who are fighting them.

However, not everyone has signed the deal. Among those not ready to put down their weapons are the al-Shabaab fighters, the Muslim youth movement.

They have control of large parts of central and southern Somalia.

Al Jazeera's Mohamed Adow filed this exclusive report.

Chad suffering from drought and food shortages

As world leaders discuss poverty and climate change from the comfort of their conference halls in Japan, the real effects of those issues are being harshly felt.

In Chad, rising temperatures have brought drought, which is reducing crop yields and causing widespread malnutrition.

Yvonne Ndege travelled to Mambou and filed this report.

Street Food - Nairobi - - Part 1

Many millions of people across Africa are dependent on street food not only for nourishment, but as a means of making a living. But poor hygiene practices cost thousands of lives. Street Food explores what, if anything, is being done to tackle the issue.

Street Food - Nairobi - Part 2

Many millions of people across Africa are dependent on street food not only for nourishment, but as a means of making a living. But poor hygiene practices cost thousands of lives. Street Food explores what, if anything, is being done to tackle the issue.

Togo's zero tolerance towards drugs

For the second time in the past 10 days, Colombian police say they have arrested a kingpin of a major cocaine cartel.

According to the police, Oscar Veral Carcia commanded a "group of hired assassins" working for the infamous Norte del Valle cartel.

'Capachivo' - as he is also known - is on Washington's most wanted list of cocaine traffickers.

Drug trafficking is also a problem across the Atlantic Ocean in West Africa.

Police in the west African state of Togo, are cracking down on drug traffickers and implementing a policy of zero tolerance when it comes to this growing problem.

Last month, 24 million dollars worth of narcotics were seized by the Togolese security forces and destroyed.

Drug trafficking through Africa is not a new phenomenon; however West Africa is increasingly becoming a hub for smuggling narcotics because of lax policing.

The small nation of Togo is battling a rise in drug-related crimes as Al Jazeera's Sherine Tadros reports.

Abyei now a ghost town

Sudan's north and south forces have begun to withdraw from Abyei, an oil rich region sandwiched between them as a highly sought after prize.

Al Jazeera's Sherine Tadros reports on how the disputed region is now a ghost town, despite aid agencies trying to encourage the thousands who fled to return home.

Video emerges of Zimbabwe 'ballot rigging'

Zimbabwe's presidential ballot has been widely condemned as neither free nor fair.

Now there appears to be video to prove it.

Secret film obtained by Britain's Guardian Newspaper group shows vote-rigging and violence leading up to the run-off, a one-man ballot which returned Robert Mugabe to power unchallenged.

Dorsa Jabbari reports.

Kenya's post-election hunger crisis

The combination of rising food prices and food shortages are creating a desperate situation in Kenya.

Vital food production was destroyed when many farms were ransacked in violence after Kenya's election period, and the price of staples, like maize, has risen as much as 70 per cent.

Ama Boateng reports.

Mogadishu - Somalia

Fighting across Somalia between gunmen and troops kills at least 47 when Islamist insurgents clashed with Ethiopian troops Ugandan peacekeepers.

African Union adopts Zimbabwe national unity resolution

The 11th African Union summit has concluded in Egypt with African leaders adopting a resolution supporting the creation of a government of national unity for Zimbabwe through dialogue.
The AU resolution encourages Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe and opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai to honor their commitment to initiating dialogue with a view to promote peace, stability, democracy and reconciliation.

African union calls for unity in Zimbabwe

The African Union called for a national unity government in Zimbabwe after the widely-condemned re-election of President Robert Mugabe.A summit of the pan-African body- divided over what to do about Zimbabwe, adopted a resolution calling for Mugabe to negotiate with opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai, who withdrew from the election because of violence.

Film Documents Pursuit of Trial for Chad's Ex-Dictator

This year's Human Rights Watch International Film Festival includes a documentary focusing on the group's lead attorney and a former political prisoner from Chad. They worked together, and without government support, to bring Chad's former dictator to trial. It's a suspenseful tale spanning several years and three continents. Carolyn Weaver reports.

Zimbabwean Refugees Watch Elections from Afar

Despite world condemnation of the electoral violence in Zimbabwe and calls on President Robert Mugabe to postpone the vote, the country held a one-candidate, run off presidential election on June 25, 2008. Residents of the capital, Harare, said they were threatened with harm if they did not vote. Opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai had pulled out of the race because of the violence. His Movement for Democratic Change says 86 of its supporters have been murdered in the lead up to the voting. Reacting to the violence, many Zimbabweans have fled the country. Among them are thousands in refugee camps in Johannesburg, South Africa, where VOA's Mandy Clark reports.

China in Africa - Part 2

In recent years, China has become the most aggressive investor nation in Africa. The Riz Khan show asks if China is exploiting African nations or offering real economic growth and opportunity to sub-Saharan Africa?

China in Africa Part 1

In recent years, China has become the most aggressive investor nation in Africa. The Riz Khan show asks if China is exploiting African nations or offering real economic growth and opportunity to sub-Saharan Africa?